Hardwood floors can last a long time, but eventually they need to be replaced. Luckily, it's a pretty straightforward process! Use a circular saw to cut the old hardwood into pieces, then remove the old flooring. Prepare your subflooring so that it's clean and perfectly level. After that, choose your replacement flooring and follow the process for installing that particular type of hardwood! Denver Hardwood Flooring
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Over the years, many hardwood floors develop small splits or cracks in the surface of the wood. These can be spot repaired with some angled nails to secure the two pieces together, along with some wood putty to hide the blemishes. If your floor is suffering from large cracks, however, you might want to think about refinishing the floor. And if the split is particularly bad, you should probably replace the damaged plank altogether. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

One of the drawbacks of cork flooring is the cost. It is more expensive than other wood flooring options. The cost of import, plus material, plus installation is more than many budgets can handle. Due to the soft nature of the flooring, it is easily damaged by furniture and shoes, but it can and should be protected just like any other type of wood floor.

Because tongue-and-groove boards are locked in place, removal involves cutting out the middle of each damaged board. The easiest way is to bore a 1-in.-dia. hole through both ends of each damaged board (photo 1). Then use a circular saw to connect the two holes (photo 2). Follow these steps to safely make the plunge cuts you need to repair your hardwood floors: 1. Adjust the depth of cut to the thickness of the floorboards. Plug in the saw and put on eye protection. 2. Pull back the retractable blade guard with your thumb. Then hold the nose of the baseplate on the floorboard and lift up the rear of the saw. 3. Align the blade with the right edge of one of the holes. Make sure the blade isn't touching the floor, then squeeze the trigger and slowly lower the spinning blade into the board. 4. Grip the saw firmly with both hands and guide it in a straight line until you cut into the right edge of the hole at the opposite end of the board. 5. Move back to the first hole, align the blade with the left edge and cut to the left edge of the second hole. Pry out the middle section with a hammer and chisel. Chop out the remaining edges, being careful not to damage any surrounding boards (photo 3). The "tongue" piece will be nailed in place, so break it out in small pieces. Then pull out the nails with a hammer or locking pliers. The existing floorboards have a tongue and groove milled on each end and along the edges. Chop off the tongue exposed by the board you just removed so you can slip in the new board (photo 4).
Judy – I’m sorry to hear this. I am surprised, but it does happen once in a while. I would probably get a 2nd opinion just to make sure. If they were solid hardwood and are now too thin, then it sounds like they’ve been refinished many times. Generally solid hardwood flooring is 3/4″ thick and that is what you should get if you put in anything new. That will then last a long time and you won’t have this issue in the future. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
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Although hardwood floors are amazingly beautiful and durable, they are not indestructible. The best floor maintenance plan for hardwood floors include regular vacuuming or sweeping with a soft bristle broom, especially in high traffic areas. Removing dirt or grit from your floors will reduce scratches. Vacuums with rotary brush heads can also scratch your floors. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Installing a hardwood floor yourself can save you money – if you know what you’re doing. Improper preparation and installation can lead to warping and buckling, which will ruin flooring that would otherwise remain beautiful for years to come. The most important thing you can do to ensure the structural integrity of your floor is to properly prepare for the installation process. Here are various articles to help you! Denver Hardwood Floor
Over the years, many hardwood floors develop small splits or cracks in the surface of the wood. These can be spot repaired with some angled nails to secure the two pieces together, along with some wood putty to hide the blemishes. If your floor is suffering from large cracks, however, you might want to think about refinishing the floor. And if the split is particularly bad, you should probably replace the damaged plank altogether. Denver Hardwood Flooring
One of the drawbacks of cork flooring is the cost. It is more expensive than other wood flooring options. The cost of import, plus material, plus installation is more than many budgets can handle. Due to the soft nature of the flooring, it is easily damaged by furniture and shoes, but it can and should be protected just like any other type of wood floor. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
With their increased durability and moisture resistance, engineered wood floors are a better option than traditional hardwoods if you have pets or spill-prone kids. Additionally, you can install engineered wood flooring in places that hardwoods typically can't go, including basements, kitchens and summer homes in high-humidity climates. This type of flooring is available in a variety of widths, colors and styles, including glue-down and floating floors. Hardwood Floor
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