Cut a new length of flooring to fit snugly into the space of the old board. It doesn't matter what kind of saw you use to repair your hardwood floors; just make sure the cuts are perfectly square. After trimming the board to length, turn it upside down and use a chisel to chop off the lower lip of the grooved edge (photo 5). That allows it to fit over the protruding tongue of the adjacent floorboard. Test-fit the new piece. If it's slightly lower than the surrounding floorboards, shim it up with strips of kraft paper. Then remove the board and spread carpenter's glue on the tongues and grooves of the new and old pieces. Slip the new board into place (photo 6), protect it with a scrap-wood block and tap it down with a hammer. Cover the board with wax paper, then hold it down overnight with heavy books or weights. An alternative to gluing: Simply face-nail the board with 6d finishing nails. Bore pilot holes at a slight angle, then drive in the nails. Tap them below the surface with a nailset (photo 7) and fill the holes with wood putty. Lightly sand the entire board smooth, but be careful not to remove too much finish from surrounding boards. After finding a matching stain color by experimenting on scraps of flooring, stain the boards to match the original floor. Let dry overnight, then apply two coats of clear polyurethane varnish. If the old floor is unstained, just apply the polyurethane. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

Price is the first obvious variable to consider. It is almost always cheaper to refinish your floor than to replace it. When replacing, you must consider the cost of the new wood as well as the installation. You can offset much of this cost by installing the floor yourself, but this is a very invasive process that requires specialized knowledge and precision. You can typically refinish a wood floor yourself, with just a few inexpensive solutions.
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Hardwood Floor

Engineered wood flooring consists of two or more layers of wood adhered together to form a plank. Typically, engineered wood flooring uses a thin layer (lamella) of a more expensive wood bonded to a core constructed from cheaper wood. The increased stability of engineered wood is achieved by running each layer at a 90° angle to the layer above. This stability makes it a universal product that can be installed over all types of subfloors above, below or on grade. Engineered wood is the most common type of wood flooring in Europe and has been growing in popularity in North America[4].
With their increased durability and moisture resistance, engineered wood floors are a better option than traditional hardwoods if you have pets or spill-prone kids. Additionally, you can install engineered wood flooring in places that hardwoods typically can't go, including basements, kitchens and summer homes in high-humidity climates. This type of flooring is available in a variety of widths, colors and styles, including glue-down and floating floors. Hardwood Floor
 116% harder than Red Oak (1)  12% harder than Red Oak (11)  123% Harder than Red Oak (4)  125% harder than Red Oak (2)  141% harder than Red Oak (2)  15% softer than Red Oak (2)  165% harder than Red Oak (2)  174% harder than Red Oak (5)  18% softer than Red Oak (1)  185% harder than Red Oak (4)  198 % harder than Red Oak (2)  2% harder than Red Oak (2)  2% Softer than Red Oak (1)  25% softer than Red Oak (1)  28% harder than Red Oak (1)  30% harder than Red Oak (8)  33% harder than Red Oak (2)  41% harder than Red Oak (7)  43% harder than Red Oak (1)  5% harder than Red Oak (8)  53% softer than Red Oak (1)  6% harder than Red Oak (14)  67% harder than Red Oak (5)  74% harder than Red Oak (2)  81% harder than Red Oak (2)  82% harder than Red Oak (2)  9% softer than Red Oak (1)  about the same as Red Oak (7)  Benchmark at 1290 on Janka Scale (37) Hardwood Floor

 Bamboo Flooring (22)  BELLAWOOD (49)  BELLAWOOD Artisan Distressed (13)  BELLAWOOD Artisan Distressed Engineered (4)  BELLAWOOD Engineered (16)  Builders Pride (26)  Builder's Pride (10)  Builder's Pride Engineered (1)  Clover Lea (9)  Major Brand (5)  Mayflower (12)  Mayflower Engineered (19)  R.L. Colston (40)  Virginia Mill Works (8)  Virginia Mill Works Engineered (21) Denver Hardwood Flooring
Put on gloves, knee pads, and protective eye glasses. You'll be working diligently on your hands and knees for hours to complete this project, especially if you're doing a large space. Invest in a good pair of knee pads to protect your knees. Sturdy work gloves will protect your hands from splinters, and goggles will prevent sawdust and other debris from getting into your eyes.[1] Denver Hardwood Floor
Floor connection system: There are a wide range of connection systems, as most of them are mill-specific manufacturing techniques. The general principle is to have grooves on all four sides of the plank with a separate, unconnected, piece that is inserted into the grooves of two planks to join them. The piece used for the connection can be made from wood, rubber, or plastic. This installation system allows for different materials (i.e. wood and metal) to be installed together if they have the same connection system. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

Cut a new length of flooring to fit snugly into the space of the old board. It doesn't matter what kind of saw you use to repair your hardwood floors; just make sure the cuts are perfectly square. After trimming the board to length, turn it upside down and use a chisel to chop off the lower lip of the grooved edge (photo 5). That allows it to fit over the protruding tongue of the adjacent floorboard. Test-fit the new piece. If it's slightly lower than the surrounding floorboards, shim it up with strips of kraft paper. Then remove the board and spread carpenter's glue on the tongues and grooves of the new and old pieces. Slip the new board into place (photo 6), protect it with a scrap-wood block and tap it down with a hammer. Cover the board with wax paper, then hold it down overnight with heavy books or weights. An alternative to gluing: Simply face-nail the board with 6d finishing nails. Bore pilot holes at a slight angle, then drive in the nails. Tap them below the surface with a nailset (photo 7) and fill the holes with wood putty. Lightly sand the entire board smooth, but be careful not to remove too much finish from surrounding boards. After finding a matching stain color by experimenting on scraps of flooring, stain the boards to match the original floor. Let dry overnight, then apply two coats of clear polyurethane varnish. If the old floor is unstained, just apply the polyurethane.
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Measure rooms one at a time. It’s easiest to measure rectangles, so if you have an “L-shaped” room, divide it into 2 rectangles and measure them separately. The length of the rectangle multiplied by the width equals the square footage. For example, a room, or section of a room, that is 20 feet long and 12 feet wide produces this formula: 20 x 12 = 240 square feet. If the flooring you are purchasing is sold by the yard, divide the square feet by 9. So, 240 square feet / 9 = 26.667 square yards. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

– If you want to change the width of the wood or the direction of the hardwood, the only way to do this is to get a new floor. The standard in home is oak 2 ¼” strip. Now, it’s more stylish and more common to get wider planks such as 3 ¼” or 4”or 5” planks. These look more modern and importantly make the room look larger. Another design trick to make the rooms look larger is to lay the planks on a diagonal – that way, it carries your eye along the longest length of the room. Or, you can even get fancy and add borders or do a herringbone pattern. Denver Hardwood Floor


There are some characteristics that are common to each category: solid wood is more frequently site-finished, is always in a plank format, is generally thicker than engineered wood, and is usually installed by nailing. Engineered wood is more frequently pre-finished, has bevelled edges, is very rarely site-finished, and is installed with glue or as a floating installation. [6] Hardwood Floor


The age of your floor also plays a role. If your floor has been in place for decades, it may resist refinishing for a number of reasons. For instance, if it has already been refinished several times or if too much of the surface wood has become exposed, refinishing your floor may have little effect. For very old floors, replacement can often be preferable to refinishing.
For example, moisture can be a factor, as variations in moisture can lead to gapping and warping. For this reason, installing hardwood flooring in full bathrooms is not recommended because of the fluctuating moisture levels. Follow manufacturer recommendations relating to moisture before selecting and installing hardwood. For more protection against moisture, use a moisture barrier.
– If you want to change the width of the wood or the direction of the hardwood, the only way to do this is to get a new floor. The standard in home is oak 2 ¼” strip. Now, it’s more stylish and more common to get wider planks such as 3 ¼” or 4”or 5” planks. These look more modern and importantly make the room look larger. Another design trick to make the rooms look larger is to lay the planks on a diagonal – that way, it carries your eye along the longest length of the room. Or, you can even get fancy and add borders or do a herringbone pattern. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Judy – I’m sorry to hear this. I am surprised, but it does happen once in a while. I would probably get a 2nd opinion just to make sure. If they were solid hardwood and are now too thin, then it sounds like they’ve been refinished many times. Generally solid hardwood flooring is 3/4″ thick and that is what you should get if you put in anything new. That will then last a long time and you won’t have this issue in the future. Hardwood Floor
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