My advice is to bring in a professional to make sure the floors can be refinished (i.e. if there is still enough room/if you didn’t permanently damage the wood), and if so, have them refinish them rather than replace them – that will be much less expensive. I don’t know where you live and the going rates, but in our area, it’s prob. the price is prob. $1-2 lower…but that may be par for your area. Call in 2-3 people to see. I would check Angie’s List (angieslist.com) for some good local people in your area. Denver Hardwood Floor
 116% harder than Red Oak (1)  12% harder than Red Oak (11)  123% Harder than Red Oak (4)  125% harder than Red Oak (2)  141% harder than Red Oak (2)  15% softer than Red Oak (2)  165% harder than Red Oak (2)  174% harder than Red Oak (5)  18% softer than Red Oak (1)  185% harder than Red Oak (4)  198 % harder than Red Oak (2)  2% harder than Red Oak (2)  2% Softer than Red Oak (1)  25% softer than Red Oak (1)  28% harder than Red Oak (1)  30% harder than Red Oak (8)  33% harder than Red Oak (2)  41% harder than Red Oak (7)  43% harder than Red Oak (1)  5% harder than Red Oak (8)  53% softer than Red Oak (1)  6% harder than Red Oak (14)  67% harder than Red Oak (5)  74% harder than Red Oak (2)  81% harder than Red Oak (2)  82% harder than Red Oak (2)  9% softer than Red Oak (1)  about the same as Red Oak (7)  Benchmark at 1290 on Janka Scale (37) Hardwood Floor
Hardwood species used in flooring are given a hardwood hardness rating, which indicates how resistant the wood is to dents and wear. This rating is based off a test called the Janka Hardness Test, and it measures the force needed to press a steel ball into the wood sample. The highest possible score on this test is a little over 5,000, with most traditional solid wood floors scoring in the 1,000-2,000 range. The superior density of Rigid Core flooring would exceed the limitations of the Janka test, and instead a higher impact testing is needed to measure real world performance. Here is how the general hardness of plank flooring ranks:

Michael – The exotic woods are a bit more challenging to work with stain wise because they are naturally darker and redder. Yes, you can refinish them and make them darker and browner. But, you will still have some underlying red tones. So, you may need to go darker than what you’re thinking to drown out the red more. Definitely test colors. Most likely, dark walnut will come out the darkest. Use duraseal…it’s a better stain, dries faster and is a bit darker than minwax.


As the name suggests, solid hardwood is a single, solid piece of wood. Its natural simplicity has made it a popular flooring choice for generations, but that same simplicity makes it less than ideal for modern homes. Wood is a naturally porous material, meaning it is soft, extremely prone to denting, and absorbs water like a sponge. All of these attributes are ideal for helping trees grow, but they don’t translate well to modern flooring. Floors today need to withstand heavy traffic, drops, scratches, and most importantly, spills. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Wood flooring can also be installed utilizing the glue-down method. This is an especially popular method for solid parquet flooring installations on concrete sub-floors. Additionally, engineered wood flooring may use the glue-down method as well. A layer of mastic is placed onto the sub-floor using a trowel similar to those used in laying ceramic tile. The wood pieces are then laid on top of the glue and hammered into place using a rubber mallet and a protected 2x4 to create a level floor. Often the parquet floor will require sanding and re-finishing after the glue-down installation method due to the small size pieces. Denver Hardwood Flooring

In general, it will almost ALWAYS be less expensive to refinish your hardwood floors. If you replace them, you need to pay for additional wood as well as ripping up and hauling away existing hardwood. If portions of your hardwood are damaged (e.g. pet stains or minor water stains), you can replace these sections and when you refinish them and it will all look new. Even if you have this, it will still be less expensive then replacing the whole floor.
The amount you pay for installation depends on a variety of factors, including where you live and the intricacy of your project. For example, furniture removal and replacement, repairing the subfloor and removing and disposing of the old floor all bump up the overall cost of the project more than simply having an installer come in and lay the flooring does. To illustrate, some installers charge 20 cents per square foot for ripping up and removing carpeting or moving furniture. Others may charge a per-appliance fee for moving appliances. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Michael – The exotic woods are a bit more challenging to work with stain wise because they are naturally darker and redder. Yes, you can refinish them and make them darker and browner. But, you will still have some underlying red tones. So, you may need to go darker than what you’re thinking to drown out the red more. Definitely test colors. Most likely, dark walnut will come out the darkest. Use duraseal…it’s a better stain, dries faster and is a bit darker than minwax. Denver Hardwood Floor

Natural warmth and beauty make wood a favorite for floors. But when the topcoat finish wears through, the porous surface of the wood is open to stains-especially beneath dining room chairs, in front of a sink and in other high-traffic, high-spill areas. Oil soap and all-purpose cleanser remove some stains, especially when the spill is fresh. But it's impossible to scrub out stains that have soaked into the wood fibers. And sanding only creates a depression in the floor that's more noticeable than the stain. The only option to repair hardwood floors at this point is to cut out the stained floorboards and install new ones. We replaced a couple of boards from a standard 3/4-in.-thick x 21/4-in.-wide oak-strip floor using a drill, circular saw and sharp chisel. To determine the exact width and thickness of the pieces you'll need, lift up a heat register or threshold and measure the exposed ends of the floorboards. You'll find hardwood flooring at a local millwork shop, lumberyard or floor-covering store. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Because tongue-and-groove boards are locked in place, removal involves cutting out the middle of each damaged board. The easiest way is to bore a 1-in.-dia. hole through both ends of each damaged board (photo 1). Then use a circular saw to connect the two holes (photo 2). Follow these steps to safely make the plunge cuts you need to repair your hardwood floors: 1. Adjust the depth of cut to the thickness of the floorboards. Plug in the saw and put on eye protection. 2. Pull back the retractable blade guard with your thumb. Then hold the nose of the baseplate on the floorboard and lift up the rear of the saw. 3. Align the blade with the right edge of one of the holes. Make sure the blade isn't touching the floor, then squeeze the trigger and slowly lower the spinning blade into the board. 4. Grip the saw firmly with both hands and guide it in a straight line until you cut into the right edge of the hole at the opposite end of the board. 5. Move back to the first hole, align the blade with the left edge and cut to the left edge of the second hole. Pry out the middle section with a hammer and chisel. Chop out the remaining edges, being careful not to damage any surrounding boards (photo 3). The "tongue" piece will be nailed in place, so break it out in small pieces. Then pull out the nails with a hammer or locking pliers. The existing floorboards have a tongue and groove milled on each end and along the edges. Chop off the tongue exposed by the board you just removed so you can slip in the new board (photo 4).
 116% harder than Red Oak (1)  12% harder than Red Oak (11)  123% Harder than Red Oak (4)  125% harder than Red Oak (2)  141% harder than Red Oak (2)  15% softer than Red Oak (2)  165% harder than Red Oak (2)  174% harder than Red Oak (5)  18% softer than Red Oak (1)  185% harder than Red Oak (4)  198 % harder than Red Oak (2)  2% harder than Red Oak (2)  2% Softer than Red Oak (1)  25% softer than Red Oak (1)  28% harder than Red Oak (1)  30% harder than Red Oak (8)  33% harder than Red Oak (2)  41% harder than Red Oak (7)  43% harder than Red Oak (1)  5% harder than Red Oak (8)  53% softer than Red Oak (1)  6% harder than Red Oak (14)  67% harder than Red Oak (5)  74% harder than Red Oak (2)  81% harder than Red Oak (2)  82% harder than Red Oak (2)  9% softer than Red Oak (1)  about the same as Red Oak (7)  Benchmark at 1290 on Janka Scale (37) Denver Hardwood Flooring
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Hardwood Floor
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