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Visual – While hardwood flooring is limited by species and stains, Rigid Core flooring has near limitless options when it comes to flooring that looks like wood. In addition to traditional wood visuals and colors, you can pick from stone looks and even hybrids that marry wood and stones together into unique new options. And best of all you will benefit from a curated look that removes unwanted imperfections like oversized knots, holes, and worming that naturally occurs in hardwood floors. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Hardwood Floor
– If your floors are REALLY OLD and have been refinished many times, it may be time for a new floor. I’m not talking about oak floors that have been dinged and scratched up…I mean if your floors have been down for over 100 yrs and refinished at least 5 times. If you can see the “tongue” where the boards fit together, it’s probably time for a new floor. Or, if your floors are rather bouncy and/or don’t seem very sturdy, it’s time for a new floor. This happens more often with pine floors as pine floors are softer and used a long time ago. Denver Hardwood Floor
Natural warmth and beauty make wood a favorite for floors. But when the topcoat finish wears through, the porous surface of the wood is open to stains-especially beneath dining room chairs, in front of a sink and in other high-traffic, high-spill areas. Oil soap and all-purpose cleanser remove some stains, especially when the spill is fresh. But it's impossible to scrub out stains that have soaked into the wood fibers. And sanding only creates a depression in the floor that's more noticeable than the stain. The only option to repair hardwood floors at this point is to cut out the stained floorboards and install new ones. We replaced a couple of boards from a standard 3/4-in.-thick x 21/4-in.-wide oak-strip floor using a drill, circular saw and sharp chisel. To determine the exact width and thickness of the pieces you'll need, lift up a heat register or threshold and measure the exposed ends of the floorboards. You'll find hardwood flooring at a local millwork shop, lumberyard or floor-covering store. Denver Hardwood Floor

Installing hardwood floors can cost between $9 and $12 per square foot, compared with about $3 to $5 per square foot for carpet — so some homeowners opt to install hardwood floors only in some rooms rather than throughout their home. However, carpet typically needs to be replaced if it becomes stained or worn out. Good quality carpet can last about 10 to 15 years, while hardwood floors can last forever.
If you get a second opinion and they can’t be refinished, then your best option will be replace them…or wait until you can replace them. Given when the house was built I’m doubting the floors are even, so putting a floating on top will be a really bad option as they will wobble. And, installing wood on top of thin wood is a really bad solution. If your foundation is weak, your floor will be weak and it will creak and separate. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Engineered wood flooring was created to lower the cost of wood flooring and attempt to fix some of solid wood’s shortcomings. It’s constructed from inexpensive plywood or particle board and topped with a thin veneer of hardwood. This construction helps with installation flexibility and slightly improves indent performance, but it adds a new set of problems as well. Because the “real” wood part of the floor is just a thin veneer, damage from scratches can be irreparable. Engineered wood floors are still made from porous wood, meaning they can’t be subjected to water. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Solid hardwood flooring adds character, warmth and value to any room in your house. Our selection of pre-finished solid hardwood flooring offers you a variety of finishes, widths, lengths, and colors to match your style, whether it is rustic or modern. There are lots of choices including oak, walnut, maple, birch, cherry and exotic hardwoods. We offer exceptional hardwood floors that will help you enhance the look of your home.
Floating installation: A floating installation is where the flooring is laid down in a glueless manner on top of a layer of underlay. The individual planks are locked together, and are not glued or nailed down to the subfloor. By doing this the floor is floating above the underlay, and can be laid on top of existing tile or marble, without the risk of damaging the subflooring. Hardwood Floor
Solid hardwood floor planks are made from a piece of wood and made to be anywhere from 18 to 20 mm thick. The boards are made with a tongue and groove to fit together for installation. Depending on the species of wood, certain floors will be harder than others. The harder the floor, the less susceptible it is to dings and scratches. The floor can be sanded and refinished several times to restore its beauty, with the total number of times being determined by the depth of the tongue from the top of the plank. Denver Hardwood Floor
This process involves treating the wood by boiling the log in water. After preparation, the wood is peeled by a blade starting from the outside of the log and working toward the center, thus creating a wood veneer. The veneer is then pressed flat with high pressure. This style of manufacturing tends to have problems with the wood cupping or curling back to its original shape. Rotary-peeled engineered hardwoods tend to have a plywood appearance in the grain.[3] Hardwood Floor
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