First, most people are unable to successfully refinish the floors themselves. It takes a lot of experience to refinish properly. Most people can’t get it smooth/even and also don’t realize that you need to sand them 3 times before putting the stain on. It’s even harder to do it right if they are pine or maple floors (and if they are, they require conditioner before stain is applied). Also, once the floors have been sanded unevenly by a non-professonal, it’s even harder to correct due to the waves usually created by the non-professional. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Like anything, whether you refinish your hardwood floors or replace them depends on your personal circumstances. If you are about to move into a new home, refinishing your hardwood floors is much easier vs. if you already live there. Clearly the cost to refinish the floors Is much less expensive than replacing them (For perspective, to replace them may cost 3-5 times as much). Denver Hardwood Floor Install
"Click" or Woodloc systems: there are a number of patented "click" systems that now exist. These click systems are either "unilin" or "fiboloc" A "click" floor is similar to tongue-and-groove, but instead of fitting directly into the groove, the board must be angled or "tapped" in to make the curved or barbed tongue fit into the modified groove. No adhesive is used when installing a "click" floor, making board replacement easier. This system not only exists for engineered wood floors but also engineered bamboo and a small number of solid floors (such as "parador solido click") and is designed to be used for floating installations. It is beneficial for the Do-It-Yourself market. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Solid wood flooring is milled from a single piece of timber that is kiln or air dried before sawing. Depending on the desired look of the floor, the timber can be cut in three ways: flat-sawn, quarter-sawn, and rift-sawn. The timber is cut to the desired dimensions and either packed unfinished for a site-finished installation or finished at the factory. The moisture content at time of manufacturing is carefully controlled to ensure the product does not warp during transport and storage.
Hardwood can match any décor, from traditional light wood floors to trendy white wood flooring, grey wood floors and dark wood floors. Start with unfinished hard wood flooring boards to create a blank canvas for stain and unique design. We also have hand-scraped hardwood and distressed wood flooring to add a rustic, timeworn look. A wide plank wood flooring can also make a room feel bigger and more modern. Hardwood flooring also has DIY installation that’s easy with tongue and groove flooring options.
Judy – I’m sorry to hear this. I am surprised, but it does happen once in a while. I would probably get a 2nd opinion just to make sure. If they were solid hardwood and are now too thin, then it sounds like they’ve been refinished many times. Generally solid hardwood flooring is 3/4″ thick and that is what you should get if you put in anything new. That will then last a long time and you won’t have this issue in the future. Denver Hardwood Floor
A number of proprietary features for solid wood floors are available. Many solid woods come with grooves cut into the back of the wood that run the length of each plank, often called 'absorption strips,' that are intended to reduce cupping. Solid wood floors are mostly manufactured 0.75 inches (19 mm) thick with a tongue-and-groove for installation.
The natural process of things will tend to close gaps as the weather and humidity changes. As a rule, if the gap is less than the thickness of a dime, your flooring is normal and there’s nothing to worry about. If your gaps are more persistent, you might need to call in a professional to tighten up your hardwood floor so that they cease to be a problem.
Instead of boiling the hardwood logs, in this process they are kept at a low humidity level and dried slowly to draw moisture from the inside of the wood cells. The logs are then sawn in the same manner as for solid hardwood planks. This style of engineered hardwood has the same look as solid hardwood, and does not have any of the potential problems of "face checking" that rotary-peel and slice-peel products have, because the product is not exposed to added moisture.

Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Solid hardwood floor planks are made from a piece of wood and made to be anywhere from 18 to 20 mm thick. The boards are made with a tongue and groove to fit together for installation. Depending on the species of wood, certain floors will be harder than others. The harder the floor, the less susceptible it is to dings and scratches. The floor can be sanded and refinished several times to restore its beauty, with the total number of times being determined by the depth of the tongue from the top of the plank. Denver Hardwood Floor Install

Width & Length – Plank flooring comes in a variety of widths and lengths. The most common widths are currently in the 5” – 6” range, but wider widths are rapidly becoming more popular. The length of your floor is also important to consider depending on the size of your space. Hardwood flooring comes in mixed lengths because imperfections are cut out of longer planks during production. Rigid Core flooring is built to size and comes in lengths ranging from 36” up to 80+”. Denver Hardwood Floor
Hardwood species used in flooring are given a hardwood hardness rating, which indicates how resistant the wood is to dents and wear. This rating is based off a test called the Janka Hardness Test, and it measures the force needed to press a steel ball into the wood sample. The highest possible score on this test is a little over 5,000, with most traditional solid wood floors scoring in the 1,000-2,000 range. The superior density of Rigid Core flooring would exceed the limitations of the Janka test, and instead a higher impact testing is needed to measure real world performance. Here is how the general hardness of plank flooring ranks: Hardwood Floor
Solid hardwood floors are made of planks milled from a single piece of timber. Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building known as joists or bearers. With the increased use of concrete as a subfloor in some parts of the world, engineered wood flooring has gained some popularity. However, solid wood floors are still common and popular. Solid wood floors have a thicker wear surface and can be sanded and finished more times than an engineered wood floor.[2] It is not uncommon for homes in New England, Eastern Canada, USA, and Europe to have the original solid wood floor still in use today. Hardwood Floor
Sand off any paint or adhesive on the subfloor (if necessary). How pristine your subfloor needs to be depends on what kind of replacement flooring you're installing. If you plan to glue your new hardwood flooring down, sand away any paint or adhesive stuck to the subfloor with an electric sander. If you're installing nail-down, floating, or locking hardwood, you don't need to sand the subfloor.[5]
All varieties provide increased durability over traditional wood, but buying engineered wood with more core layers and a thicker veneer offers the most durability. Engineered flooring is available in a wide range of woods, colors and finishes. Here are a few of the most popular engineered flooring options, along with some unique characteristics of each and average pricing:
Not only is bamboo resistant to moisture, but it is environmentally friendly and an optimal choice for those who are looking to build “green.” The plant grows faster and does not take as long to re-grow than a typical hardwood tree, therefore not contributing to deforestation. Bamboo flooring is softer than traditional hardwoods, so it will not cause pain if it is stood on for long periods of time. The softness of the floor will also reduce noise. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
– If your floors are REALLY OLD and have been refinished many times, it may be time for a new floor. I’m not talking about oak floors that have been dinged and scratched up…I mean if your floors have been down for over 100 yrs and refinished at least 5 times. If you can see the “tongue” where the boards fit together, it’s probably time for a new floor. Or, if your floors are rather bouncy and/or don’t seem very sturdy, it’s time for a new floor. This happens more often with pine floors as pine floors are softer and used a long time ago. Denver Hardwood Floor Install
Installing hardwood floors can cost between $9 and $12 per square foot, compared with about $3 to $5 per square foot for carpet — so some homeowners opt to install hardwood floors only in some rooms rather than throughout their home. However, carpet typically needs to be replaced if it becomes stained or worn out. Good quality carpet can last about 10 to 15 years, while hardwood floors can last forever.
The Blue Ridge Hickory Morning Fog 3/4 in. The Blue Ridge Hickory Morning Fog 3/4 in. Solid Hardwood Flooring is sealed with an Alpha Alumina finish providing protection from every day wear. This product carries a 50-year finish warranty. Each plank features a micro beveled edge and micro beveled end. You can feel confident purchasing this product because ...  More + Product Details Close Denver Hardwood Floor Install
 116% harder than Red Oak (1)  12% harder than Red Oak (11)  123% Harder than Red Oak (4)  125% harder than Red Oak (2)  141% harder than Red Oak (2)  15% softer than Red Oak (2)  165% harder than Red Oak (2)  174% harder than Red Oak (5)  18% softer than Red Oak (1)  185% harder than Red Oak (4)  198 % harder than Red Oak (2)  2% harder than Red Oak (2)  2% Softer than Red Oak (1)  25% softer than Red Oak (1)  28% harder than Red Oak (1)  30% harder than Red Oak (8)  33% harder than Red Oak (2)  41% harder than Red Oak (7)  43% harder than Red Oak (1)  5% harder than Red Oak (8)  53% softer than Red Oak (1)  6% harder than Red Oak (14)  67% harder than Red Oak (5)  74% harder than Red Oak (2)  81% harder than Red Oak (2)  82% harder than Red Oak (2)  9% softer than Red Oak (1)  about the same as Red Oak (7)  Benchmark at 1290 on Janka Scale (37) Hardwood Floor

 Acacia (9)  American Walnut (1)  Ash (5)  Bamboo (22)  Beech (5)  Birch (3)  Bloodwood (2)  Brazilian Cherry (10)  Brazilian Chestnut (5)  Brazilian Koa (9)  Brazilian Oak (5)  Brazilian Walnut (5)  Cumaru (3)  Curupay (2)  Hevea (4)  Hickory (27)  Maple (14)  Oak (15)  Pecan (3)  Pine (10)  Purple Heart (2)  Red Cumaru (2)  Red Maple (1)  Red Oak (40)  Short Leaf Acacia (3)  ShortLeaf Acacia (1)  Spanish Hickory (3)  Tamboril (2)  Tauari (3)  Walnut (1)  White Oak (34) Hardwood Floor


No matter what type of hardwood flooring you choose, proper care and maintenance will help them look beautiful even longer. First off, don’t let the dirt and dust collect. At least once a week, you’ll want to go over your hardwood floors with a broom or dust mop to pick up any dirt, dust, hair or pet dander. If you’re using a vacuum, make sure it’s set to ‘wood floors’ so that you’re not beating up your floors and damaging them in the process.
Tongue-and-groove: One side and one end of the plank have a groove, the other side and end have a tongue (protruding wood along an edge's center). The tongue and groove fit snugly together, thus joining or aligning the planks, and are not visible once joined. Tongue-and-groove flooring can be installed by glue-down (both engineered and solid), floating (mostly engineered only), or nail-down (not recommended for most engineered). Denver Hardwood Flooring
We live in a 1924 home with very heavy thick oak woodwork thru out. It also has oak floors, quarter sawn in narrow strips, that In most rooms are in need of refinishing. We had a professional come & take a look yesterday, she said the flooring is too thin to sand & refinish. I was shocked, the floors have never been refinished. I was so disappointed. What can be done, if anything? We also have extended our kitchen & wanted to put oak flooring down to match the rest of the house. She said they don’t make this thickness anymore & the new flooring would be much thicker, therefore making it higher than the dining room that opens to it. Hardwood Floor
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