As the name suggests, solid hardwood is a single, solid piece of wood. Its natural simplicity has made it a popular flooring choice for generations, but that same simplicity makes it less than ideal for modern homes. Wood is a naturally porous material, meaning it is soft, extremely prone to denting, and absorbs water like a sponge. All of these attributes are ideal for helping trees grow, but they don’t translate well to modern flooring. Floors today need to withstand heavy traffic, drops, scratches, and most importantly, spills.
No matter what type of hardwood flooring you choose, proper care and maintenance will help them look beautiful even longer. First off, don’t let the dirt and dust collect. At least once a week, you’ll want to go over your hardwood floors with a broom or dust mop to pick up any dirt, dust, hair or pet dander. If you’re using a vacuum, make sure it’s set to ‘wood floors’ so that you’re not beating up your floors and damaging them in the process. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Jasper, Mazama, and the other brands of hardwood flooring we offer are premium quality, delivering everything you want in a hardwood floor - look, strength, durability, and ongoing value for properties. And we offer them to you at incredible pricing not found anywhere else. While we sell discount hardwood flooring, we will never sell cheap hardwood flooring. All of our products undergo rigorous product quality testing before we offer them to you and they are constantly rechecked for quality to ensure you always get the best products while still paying below wholesale prices. Denver Hardwood Flooring
Like anything, whether you refinish your hardwood floors or replace them depends on your personal circumstances. If you are about to move into a new home, refinishing your hardwood floors is much easier vs. if you already live there. Clearly the cost to refinish the floors Is much less expensive than replacing them (For perspective, to replace them may cost 3-5 times as much).
The natural process of things will tend to close gaps as the weather and humidity changes. As a rule, if the gap is less than the thickness of a dime, your flooring is normal and there’s nothing to worry about. If your gaps are more persistent, you might need to call in a professional to tighten up your hardwood floor so that they cease to be a problem.

This process involves treating the wood by boiling the log in water. After preparation, the wood is peeled by a blade starting from the outside of the log and working toward the center, thus creating a wood veneer. The veneer is then pressed flat with high pressure. This style of manufacturing tends to have problems with the wood cupping or curling back to its original shape. Rotary-peeled engineered hardwoods tend to have a plywood appearance in the grain.[3] Denver Hardwood Flooring
Maple is another great choice for hardwood flooring. Many people prefer its light tan look, which blends into home interior spaces. As one of the strongest woods, maple is a top choice for high-traffic areas of a home. The wood doesn’t scuff easily, making it a good choice for homes with children or those with a lot of foot traffic across the floors. Maple requires minimal maintenance, with weekly sweeping and annual applications of wood soap to prolong the life of the floors.
 Acacia (9)  American Walnut (1)  Ash (5)  Bamboo (22)  Beech (5)  Birch (3)  Bloodwood (2)  Brazilian Cherry (10)  Brazilian Chestnut (5)  Brazilian Koa (9)  Brazilian Oak (5)  Brazilian Walnut (5)  Cumaru (3)  Curupay (2)  Hevea (4)  Hickory (27)  Maple (14)  Oak (15)  Pecan (3)  Pine (10)  Purple Heart (2)  Red Cumaru (2)  Red Maple (1)  Red Oak (40)  Short Leaf Acacia (3)  ShortLeaf Acacia (1)  Spanish Hickory (3)  Tamboril (2)  Tauari (3)  Walnut (1)  White Oak (34) Hardwood Floor

Although many people speak about hardwood floors as a single building material, it’s important to understand that they can be made from dozens of different tree varieties, and each has a different color, price and durability. Here are a few of the most popular hardwood flooring options, along with some unique characteristics of each and average pricing: Hardwood Floor
To fix a buckled floorboard, you need to be able to access the floor from below. The way to tackle this problem is to put weight on the buckled area from above — a cement block works well. Then install a 1 1/4-inch screw in the buckled flooring from below. Allow the screw to penetrate only halfway into the flooring, or it may come up through the finished surface. Driving the screw through the subfloor and into the flooring pulls the flooring down against the subfloor and gets rid of the buckled spot.
I love it! I actually have an entire wall dedicated to most of my hand tools. And I want to build a miter station along one wall at some point. I’m tempted to add a bunch of drawers for a clean look and to keep dust travel off of shelves, but I have a serious “out of sight, out of mind” mentality. I think I’m going with shelves and a few drawers as a compromise. Outstanding workmanship!
Eliminate any problem spots to make the subfloor level. Sand minor humps down with a hand-held or orbital sander to make the subfloor level. To fill any dips or low spots, use a leveling compound (also known as floor patch). Mix up the compound according to package directions, fill in the dips, then pull your straight piece of lumber back and forth over the spot to flatten and level it with the rest of the subfloor.[7] Hardwood Floor
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